Sunday, August 12, 2018

Implanted by Lauren C Teffeau


Implanted by Lauren C Teffeau

The data stored in her blood can save a city on the brink… or destroy it, in this gripping cyberpunk thriller

When college student Emery Driscoll is blackmailed into being a courier for a clandestine organisation, she’s cut off from the neural implant community which binds the domed city of New Worth together. Her new masters exploit her rare condition which allows her to carry encoded data in her blood, and train her to transport secrets throughout the troubled city. New Worth is on the brink of Emergence – freedom from the dome – but not everyone wants to leave. Then a data drop goes bad, and Emery is caught between factions: those who want her blood, and those who just want her dead.

Forthcoming from Angry Robot Books

Saturday, August 11, 2018

FEROCIOUS by Paula Stokes

In Ferocious, Paula Stokes returns to the world of Vicarious in this sequel, a high-action psychological thriller with a protagonist out for vengeance.

When Winter Kim finds out that her sister is dead and that she has a brother she never knew about, only two things matter—finding what’s left of her family and killing the man who destroyed her life. Her mission leads her from St. Louis to Los Angeles back to South Korea, where she grew up.

Things get increasingly dangerous once Winter arrives in Seoul. Aided by her friends Jesse and Sebastian, Winter attempts to infiltrate an international corporation to get close to her target, a nefarious businessman named Kyung. But keeping her last remaining loved ones out of the line of fire proves difficult, and when all seems to be lost, Winter must face one last devastating decision: is revenge worth sacrificing everything for? Or can she find a spark of hope in the darkness that threatens to engulf her?

“A total mind-bending thrill ride with a heroine that's as smart as she is strong.”—Lindsay Cummings, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Murder Complex

“A powerful, kick-ass girl caught up in a high-tech, twisty mystery. But buckle up! This thrill ride travels at breakneck speed.”—Justine Magazine

“Reading Vicarious is like tiptoeing across a field of landmines. Blindfolded. In other words, I loved this book!”—Victoria Scott, author of Titans


PAULA STOKES grew up in St. Louis, Missouri, where she studied psychology and nursing. In between pursuing her degrees, she spent a year teaching English in Seoul, South Korea. Stokes is the author of several novels, including Liars, Inc. She currently lives in Portland, Oregon.

On Sale August 28, 2018 from Tor Teen. 9780765380975. $9.99 USD.


Friday, August 10, 2018

ENHANCED by Carrie Jones

Carrie Jones, the New York Times bestselling author of Flying, presents another science fiction adventure of cheerleader-turned-alien-hunter Mana in Enhanced.

Seventeen-year-old Mana has found and rescued her mother, but her work isn’t done yet. Her mother may be out of alien hands, but she’s in a coma, unable to tell anyone what she knows.

Mana is ready to take action. The only problem? Nobody will let her. Lyle, her best friend and almost-boyfriend (for a minute there, anyway), seems to want nothing to do with hunting aliens, despite his love of Doctor Who. Bestie Seppie is so desperate to stay out of it, she’s actually leaving town. And her mom’s hot but arrogant alien-hunting partner, China, is ignoring Mana's texts, cutting her out of the mission entirely.

They all know the alien threat won't stay quiet for long. It’s up to Mana to fight her way back in.

“Witty dialogue and flawless action.”—VOYA

“YA readers, you’re in for a treat this week. Hilarious and action-packed, this novel is sure to be the perfect summer read.”—Bookish


CARRIE JONES is the New York Times and internationally bestselling author of the Need series, as well as After Obsession with Steven E. Wedel. She is a distinguished alum of Vermont College's MFA Program and a volunteer firefighter in Maine.

On Sale August 28, 2018 from Tor Teen. 9780765336606. $9.99 USD

Thursday, August 9, 2018

Invisible Planets, Chinese Science Fiction

Invisible Planets, edited by multi award-winning writer Ken Liu--translator of the bestselling and Hugo Award-winning novel The Three Body Problem by acclaimed Chinese author Cixin Liu--is his second thought-provoking anthology of Chinese short speculative fiction. Invisible Planets is a groundbreaking anthology of Chinese short speculative fiction.

The thirteen stories in this collection, including two by Cixin Liu and the Hugo and Sturgeon award-nominated “Folding Beijing” by Hao Jingfang, add up to a strong and diverse representation of Chinese SF. Some have won awards, some have garnered serious critical acclaim, some have been selected for Year’s Best anthologies, and some are simply Ken Liu’s personal favorites.

To round out the collection, there are several essays from Chinese scholars and authors, plus an illuminating introduction by Ken Liu. Anyone with an interest in international science fiction will find Invisible Planets an indispensable addition to their collection.

"These stories, along with the rest of the anthology, represent the best in both science fiction and works in translation, detailing situations that appear alien on the surface but deftly reframe contemporary issues to give readers a new view of familiar human experiences.A phenomenal anthology of short speculative fiction." —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"Greatly varied in theme and approach, all of these stories impress with their visionary sweep and scope...superb compilation." —Publishers Weekly, starred review


KEN LIU (translator) is a writer, lawyer, and computer programmer. His short story "The Paper Menagerie" was the first work of fiction ever to sweep the Nebula, Hugo, and World Fantasy Awards.

On sale August 21, 2018, from Tor Books. 9780765384201. $16.99 USD.

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

A New Civil War Novel

The fifth historical novel of New York Times bestselling author Ralph Peters's breathtaking, Boyd Award-winning Civil War series

Written with the literary flair and historical accuracy readers expect from Ralph Peters, Judgment at Appomattox takes readers through the Civil War’s last grim interludes of combat as flags fall and hearts break.

A great war nears its end. Robert E. Lee makes a desperate, dramatic gamble that fails. Richmond falls. Each day brings new combat and more casualties, as Lee’s exhausted, hungry troops race to preserve the Confederacy. But Grant does not intend to let Lee escape. . . . In one of the most thrilling episodes in American history, heroes North and South battle each other across southern Virginia as the armies converge on a sleepy country court house.

Capping the author’s acclaimed five-novel cycle on the war in the East, this “dramatized history” pays homage to all the soldiers who fought, from an Irish-immigrant private wearing gray, to the “boy generals” who mastered modern war. This is a grand climax to a great, prize-winning series that honors—and reveals—America’s past.

“For those who want to truly understand what the war was like for the men who fought and endured it, there is no better reference than Ralph Peters’ five Civil War novels . . . superbly researched, richly imagined, brilliantly written.” —America’s Civil War

"Epic . . . battles explode from Ralph Peters' pen . . . with his five-novel masterwork—from Gettysburg to Appomattox—Peters has become one of our most important historians." —Washington Times


RALPH PETERS is an award-winning, bestselling novelist; a retired U.S. Army officer and former enlisted man; the author of numerous works on strategy; and a popular media commentator. In uniform and as a researcher and journalist, he has covered numerous conflicts and trouble spots, from Africa to the Caucasus, from Iraq to Pakistan.

Renowned for accuracy and authenticity, his Civil War writing, under his own name and as Owen Parry, has won numerous prizes, including the American Library Association’s Boyd Award (three times), the Hammett Prize, the Herodotus Award, the Grady McWhiney Award, and the Meade Society’s Order of Merit. Peters was the recipient of the 2015 Andrew J. Goodpaster prize as an outstanding American soldier-scholar, and in 2017 he was inducted into the U.S. Army's Officer Candidate School Hall of Fame.

His Civil War series, the Battle Hymn Cycle, spans five books: Cain at Gettysburg, Hell or Richmond, Valley of the Shadow, The Damned of Petersburg, and Judgment at Appomattox.

On Sale August 21, 2018 from Forge Books. 9780765371729. $17.99 USD.

Monday, August 6, 2018

A short neurological test



1- Find the C below - Please do not use any cursor help.

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

2- If you already found the C, now find the 6 below.

999999999999999999999999999999 99999999999999999
999999999999999999999999999999 99999999999999999
999999999999999999999999999999 99999999999999999
699999999999999999999999999999 99999999999999999
999999999999999999999999999999 99999999999999999
999999999999999999999999999999 99999999999999999

3 - Now find the N below. It's a little more difficult.

MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMNMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

This is NOT a joke. If you were able to pass these 3 tests, you can cancel your annual visit to your neurologist.
Your brain is great and you're far from having a close relationship with Alzheimer.

Sunday, August 5, 2018

See You at Walmart


Yesterday, I wore my Korean War Veterans’ cap to Walmart. There was nothing in particular that I needed at the
world's largest retailer; but, since I retired, trips to "Wally World" to look at the Wal-martians is always good for some
comic relief. Besides, I always feel pretty normal after seeing some of the people that frequent the establishment.

But, I digress, . . . enough of my psychological fixations. While standing in line to check out, the guy in front of me,
probably in his early thirties, asked, "Are you a Viet Nam Vet?"
 "No," I replied.
 "Then why are you wearing that cap?"
 "Because I couldn't find the one from the War of 1812 . . ." I thought it was a snappy retort.
 "The War of 1812, huh?" the Wal-martian queried, "When was that?"
 God forgive me, but I couldn't pass up such an opportunity. "1946," I answered as straight-faced as possible.
 He pondered my response for a moment and responded, "Why do they call it the War of 1812 if it was in 1946?"
 "It was a Black Op. No one is supposed to know about it." This was beginning to be way fun!
 "Dude! Really?" He exclaimed. "How did you get to do something that COOOOL?"
 I glanced furtively around me for effect, leaned toward the guy and in a low voice said, "I'm not sure. I was the only Caucasian on the mission."
 "Dude," he was really getting excited about what he was hearing, "that is seriously awesome! But, didn't you kind of stand out?"
 "Not really. The other guys were wearing white camouflage."
 The moron nodded knowingly. "Listen man," I said in a very serious tone, "You can't tell anyone about this.
It's still 'top secret' and I shouldn't have said anything."
 "Oh yeah?" he gave me the 'don't threaten me look.' "Like, what's gonna happen if I do?"
 With a really hard look I said, "You have a family don't you? We wouldn't want anything to happen to them, would we?"

The guy gulped, left his basket where it was and fled through the door. The lady behind me started laughing so
hard I thought she was about to have a heart attack. I just grinned at her. After checking out and going to the parking
lot, I saw dimwit leaning in a car window talking to a young woman. Upon catching sight of me he started pointing
excitedly in my direction. Giving him another 'deadly' serious look, I made the 'I see you' gesture. He turned kind of
pale, jumped in the car and sped out of the parking lot.

And these people actually VOTE !!! What a great time! Tomorrow I'm going back wearing my Homeland Security
cap. Then the next day I will go to the driver's license bureau wearing my Border Patrol hat and see how long it takes
to empty the place. Whoever said retirement is boring? You just need to wear the right kind of cap!

See you at Walmart

Saturday, August 4, 2018

SENIOR CITIZENS ARE THE NATION'S LEADING CARRIERS OF AIDS !


HEARING AIDS
BAND AIDS
ROLL AIDS
WALKING AIDS
MEDICAL AIDS
GOVERNMENT AIDS
MOST OF ALL,
MONETARY AIDS TO THEIR KIDS !
Not forgetting HIV (Hair is Vanishing)
[Source: USS Samuel Gompers | Harry Hudson | July 18, 2018 ++]

Friday, August 3, 2018

Heaven


Stormy Daniels and Queen Elizabeth went to the Pearly Gates on the same day, and both met with an angel to find
out if they would be admitted to Heaven. The Angel said: "Unfortunately, there's only one space available in Heaven
today so I must decide which one of you will be admitted." The Angel then asked Stormy if there was some particular
reason why she should go to Heaven.

Stormy took off her top and said: "Look at these, they're the most perfect breasts God ever created and I'm sure it
will please God to be able to see them every day, for eternity." The Angel thanked Stormy, and asked Her Majesty,
Queen Elizabeth the same question. The Queen walked over to a toilet, pulled the lever and flushed it without saying
a word. The Angel immediately stated: "Okay, your Majesty, you may go into Heaven."

Stormy was outraged and asked, "What was that all about? I showed you two of God's own perfect creations and
you turned me down. She simply flushed a commode and got admitted to Heaven! "Could you explain that to me?"
"Sorry, Stormy," said the Angel, "but even in Heaven, a royal flush easily beats a pair, no matter how big they are!"

Thursday, August 2, 2018

a love for words


Lexophile describes those that have a love for words, such as "you can tune a piano, but you can't tuna fish," or "To
write with a broken pencil is pointless" An annual competition is held by the New York Times to see who can create
the best original lexophile. Here are some of the submissions:

 No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.
 If you don't pay your exorcist you can get repossessed.
 I'm reading a book about anti-gravity. I just can't put it down.
 I didn't like my beard at first. Then it grew on me.
 Did you hear about the crossed-eyed teacher who lost her job because she couldn't control her pupils?
 When you get a bladder infection, urine trouble.
 When chemists die, they barium.
 I stayed up all night to see where the sun went, and then it dawned on me.
 I changed my iPod's name to Titanic. It's syncing now.
 England has no kidney bank, but it does have a Liverpool.
 Haunted French pancakes give me the crepes.
 This girl today said she recognized me from the Vegetarians Club, but I'd swear I've never met herbivore.
 I know a guy who's addicted to drinking brake fluid, but he says he can stop any time.
 A thief who stole a calendar got twelve months.
 When the smog lifts in Los Angeles U.C.L.A.
 I got some batteries that were given out free of charge.
 A dentist and a manicurist married. They fought tooth and nail.
 A will is a dead giveaway.
 With her marriage, she got a new name and a dress.
 Police were summoned to a daycare center where a three-year-old was resisting a rest.
 Did you hear about the fellow whose entire left side was cut off? He's all right now.
 A bicycle can't stand alone; it's just two tired.
 The guy who fell onto an upholstery machine last week is now fully recovered.
 He had a photographic memory but it was never fully developed.
 When she saw her first strands of gray hair she thought she'd dye.
 Acupuncture is a jab well done. That's the point of it.
 Those who get too big for their pants will be totally exposed in the end

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Nine Important Facts to Remember as We Grow Older


God's Plan for Aging ….


Most seniors never get enough exercise. In His wisdom God decreed that seniors become forgetful so they would have
to search for their glasses, keys and other things, thus doing more walking. And God looked down and saw that it was
good. Then God saw there was another need. In His wisdom He made seniors lose co-ordination so they would drop
things, requiring them to bend, reach, and stretch. And God looked down and saw that it was good. Then God
considered the function of bladders and decided seniors would have additional calls of nature, requiring more trips to
the bathroom, thus providing more exercise. God looked down and saw that it was good. So if you find as you age,
you are getting up and down more, remember it's God's will. It is all in your best interest even though you mutter
under your breath.

Nine Important Facts to Remember as We Grow Older

#9 Death is the number 1 killer in the world.
#8 Life is sexually transmitted.
#7 Good health is merely the slowest possible rate at which one can die.
#6 Men have 2 motivations: hunger and hanky panky, and they can't tell them apart. If you see a gleam in his eyes, make him a sandwich.
#5 Give a person a fish and you feed them for a day. Teach a person to use the Internet and they won't bother you for weeks, months, maybe years.
#4 Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in the hospital, dying of nothing.
#3 All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.
#2 In the 60's, people took LSD to make the world weird. Now the world is weird, and people take Prozac to make it normal.
#1 Life is like a jar of jalapeno peppers. What you do today may be a burning issue tomorrow.

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Conversations with Caity & Candice: Sexism

Conversations with Caity & Candice: Sexism
by Caity Lotz and Candice Patton
COPYRIGHT 2018 FOR THE AUTHORS AND THE BARYON REVIEW.

THIS IS SHARED FROM SHETHORITY.COM, A NEW WEBSITE CREATED BY THESE TWO AMAZING LADIES TO SHARE THEIR AND OTHERS THOUGHTS ON A NUMBER OF SUBJECTS. AT THE END OF THE ARTICLE, THEY SAID "PLEASE SHARE" AND I AM DOING JUST THAT.

In these interview series we ask each other questions and try to get to the bottom of some taboo and controversial topics. We don’t have all the answers, but our hope to start a conversation. This is part of one of the series on sexism.

Candice: What’s one of the most pressing ways sexism and gender bias is affecting your life currently?

Caity: I think the biggest way it’s affected me are the expectations and limitations I put on myself as a result of it. I had self esteem issues when I was younger because I felt like I wasn’t pretty enough and as a result, I was letting people down and had less to offer to offer the world. I feel like little boys were encouraged to be successful, build businesses, invent things, and make their mark in the world. Which, granted is its own pressure, but at least it’s something you can work hard at and have a chance at achieving. Whereas there’s only so much you can do about the way you look. It took a lot of self work but I stopped associating my value with my looks. There’s an amazing quote that nails all of this on the head, “You Don’t Have to Be Pretty. You don’t owe prettiness to anyone. Not to your boyfriend/spouse/partner, not to your co-workers, especially not to random men on the street. You don’t owe it to your mother, you don’t owe it to your children, you don’t owe it to civilization in general. Prettiness is not a rent you pay for occupying a space marked ‘female.’”

Candice: I love that.

Caity: I hope things continue to change and little girls will grow up knowing they have so much more to offer than their looks. I have a 2-year-old niece and I try to always compliment her attributes rather than her looks. So instead of “You’re so pretty” I say “You’re so smart/kind/strong.” I want her to get attention for who she is not how she looks.

Candice: Yeah, my niece is 1 and a half and I try to do the same thing. She’s so beautiful (at least to me) and I worry that will be the predominant compliment she’ll get. Sometimes when that’s all you hear, you start to think that’s all you have to offer, so I want to be an influence in her life that reminds her she’s so much more than that.

Candice: We hear this phrase “toxic masculinity” more and more. I know I’ve experienced it in my personal and professional life. Have you? What do you want young men to understand about women and about toxic masculinity?

Caity: For those of you not familiar with the term, it’s about the negative effects created when a man is restricting his emotions and actions to adhere to strict male gender role. When men aren’t allowed to express all their emotions it all becomes anger, and they feel pressured to act as the alpha and assert themselves. I think it’s pretty easy to see how that could create problems. I’ve definitely felt the toxicity of it especially in relationships.

We talk a lot about how gender stereotypes negatively effect women, but it can be just as damaging for men. It’s like we make people fit in to a box with a label and if they don’t they are ostracized. So people over compensate and suppress their true-self, which creates problems for everyone. I think what’s happening right now with gender is going to be really good for the world. It’s like we are tearing down the gender walls and rebuilding it all to be more fluid and accepting.

Caity: I think sometimes about raising a son one day and how best to do it. What do you think is important for him to value and respect about women?

Candice: Our strength for sure. Our complexities. Our boundaries. What about you?

Caity: I hope by being a good mother he would respect women because he would respect me. If you teach him to be a good human he will be a good man (or whatever gender identity he decides to be). I think you would really enjoy this NYTimes article:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/01/well/family/metoo-sons-sexual-harassment-parenting-boys.html


Caity: I didn’t realize some of the negative effects of sexism until I was older and then it was like a flood gate of realizations for me. From major to minor things that affected the way I thought, dreamed, and acted. What was the experience like for you?

Candice: I agree. My experience was similar. I didn’t really understand or see the negative effects of sexism till later in life. I’ve been thinking about feminism a lot lately and how I came to really care about these issues and why I didn’t see it as much when I was younger. And I realized a lot of it came from my father. My dad was always extremely proud and supportive of me. He believed I could do anything I wanted. He treated me just like my brother. My goals and limitations were never set by my gender (or my race for that matter). So I moved through the world subconsciously believing I could do whatever my heart dreamed of. And it wasn’t until I got older and into the real world that I realized other men and even other women didn’t think that way. I was angry. Feminism wasn’t something we discussed in my household, it was just a way of life in terms of women being equal. My parents shared responsibilities. Both parents worked. Both paid bills. And both were respected. And that was my model. So I was confused as I got older and saw that that wasn’t the norm everywhere.

Caity: Speaking of parents, what’s something your parents said to you when you were younger that was annoying but now you get it?

Candice: My mom would say two things that annoyed me. lol

“You can catch more bees with honey than with vinegar” and “Pick your battles.” I think both of them speak to an issue I had when I was younger and something I’ve gotten better about. Naturally I’m a fighter. I believe in righteousness and justice. And boy would I fight. I wanted every wrong (at least in my eyes) righted. In my mind I had the energy to fight every battle and my mom said, “Candice as you get older you won’t have the energy, and you’ll have to choose.” Boy, was she right! I’m tired, girl.

So I’m conservative with my energy and my time. Not everything gets a response. Not everything gets a fight. And not every wrong gets righted. And that’s ok, because when the big battles hit in my life, you better believe I’m coming with everything I’ve got.

Candice: What’s been your relationship with women throughout your life. I know you have a lot of the same friends from when you were in grade school. How important is that to you? And how to you work to maintain those relationships.

Caity: My tribe! I would not be who I am today without my girlfriends. Most of my crew have been friends and entrenched in each other’s lives since grade school. I can’t even describe how grateful I am to have found such supportive, smart, spiritual, curious, and generous friends. They make me brave because I know they have my back. You (Candice) have met them, they’re the shit right?

Candice: Your friends are amazing!

Caity: I really do mean it when we say we want you in the tribe. We’re always looking to extend the family.

Candice: I accept this rose!

Candice: So you went to Italy recently and said you went to a restaurant that gave your boyfriend a menu with prices and gave you the “lady menu” without prices. How did you feel about this? I know for me there are traditional roles men and women play that I still very much adore and find beautiful. Holding open doors for example. I’m sure for men, as women become more self assured and independent in many areas of their life, it makes it hard for them to understand what things to keep doing and what to not. What are your thoughts on that? And what are a few traditional gender roles regarding men that you still find endearing?

Caity: Don’t forget, at the end of the meal they handed him the bill and me a cute box with cookies in it! I mean I loved it, but then I was like, wait am I not supposed to like it?! It is pretty presumptuous. What if I’m the one paying the bill? Or what if the guy wanted to split and now he feels pressure? I think we’re in an interesting time where gender roles are being blurred or redefined and we’re all just trying to figure it out. So it’s a good time to not be easily offended and have a lot of open dialogue.

It must be confusing for guys. “Treat me like a powerful capable woman, but also treat me like a delicate flower and take care of me. Take charge and be a man, but don’t tell me what to do.” A guy friend told me a woman got mad at him for opening the door for her, which I don’t think is fair. If it makes you feel offended having someone open the door for you than maybe just say, “after you, please” and hold the door for him.

Personally, I love it when a guy helps me with my bags, pulls out my chair, or gives me his jacket when I’m cold. I like the idea that the guy picking up the check, but I recognize that totally unfair to have to do all the time. All the sweet things from old traditions I like, but I’m not into the women can’t work, make decisions, and are basically property of men things.

Candice: I love chivalry as well. I find all of those gestures extremely endearing. I had a boyfriend once who would open the passenger door for me to get in and buckle my seatbelt and then kiss me on his way out. I loved it every single time. I think every woman is different though. For me personally I like a man who enjoys being chivalrous because I don’t think it takes ANYTHING away from my strength. I think once that occurs, then there’s a problem.

Caity: Ya, I do wonder if that means we’re trying to have our cake and eat it too? Though, when I think about it…I guess I do all those things for people as well. If my friend is freezing I’ll give them my jacket, I open the door for strangers, help if someone has lots of bags, etc. When I’m with my boyfriend, he usually prefers to be the one doing these things for me, and it makes us both feel good. Though he doesn’t mind when I pick up the check sometimes lol.

I think it’s just both finding ways to show your love, it can’t be one sided. Both people in a relationship need to feel like you’re taking care of each other. Those can be “traditional” ways if it works for you or you can mix it up. It’s up for you and your partner to decide.

Candice: Equal pay is such a big topic right now and one we’ve discussed on many occasions. Even recently it was discovered Claire Foy was getting paid less than her male co-star for The Crown in which she was clearly the lead. How do we assure that women are being paid equal to their male counterparts in industries like ours where the lines are blurry? What’s the biggest factor/hurdle in addressing equal pay?

Caity: It drives me nuts when people think that a wage gap doesn’t exist. There are so many layers to this issue it’s hard to explain, but it goes way beyond women just needing to not settle for less than they should be getting. It happens in every industry but I’ll focus on the one I know best. The entertainment industry works off a quote system, meaning your next job goes off of how much you got paid on your last job. Women and minorities have traditionally had fewer opportunities for leading roles, so less of a chance to get their quote up. So even as the tides start to change our quotes are a lot less so we get paid a lot less.

Candice: SAY IT LOUDER!

Caity: Lol, I’ll keep going then! A lot of the decision makers in the industry, who are mostly white men, either consciously or subconsciously view white men as more valuable than women and minorities. There is this very real feeling of, “You should be grateful, and if you don’t take this offer, we’ll find some other pretty girl that will.” Like it’s just filling the spot of “love interest” or “token black guy”. Like you’re easily replaceable. Now that we’re starting to tell more diverse stories and consumers are supporting it, we are seeing some real change. We still have a lot of catching up to do but I feel optimistic about the direction we are heading. We’ll see!

Candice: (singing) “PAY ME WHAT YOU OWE ME!” I love that song.

It’s an interesting time. I think #MeToo and #TimesUp and other similar initiatives have made people see that women are not afraid to speak up. I think it’s put a lot of industries on notice. Our voices are so powerful. We truly are stronger together. It’s still a complex topic though. I think we are conditioned not to speak about pay. It’s not “polite,” but you know what? Where has that gotten us?

I also think this is where our male counterparts can be a huge help to our fight. If they used their privilege to share information about their salaries and if they used their voices to fight for parity that would be huge asset in the fight for equal pay.

Caity: I may have gone on a rant there and I don’t want men to feel attacked, because that’s not what the feminist movement is about. So to all the men out there… We love you and value everything you bring to the table. When you see and treat us as equals, it allows us to be the best women we can be for you, ourselves, and the world. We’re all in this together.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Batwoman TV Series in Development


Batwoman TV Series in Development, Will Feature Out Lesbian Kate Kane

By Andy Swift / July 17 2018, 7:59 AM PDT

Previously announced as the special guest for this fall’s four-way crossover event, Batwoman is now being developed as a series for The CW by Warner Bros. Television and Berlanti Productions, TVLine has learned.

Slated for a potential 2019 premiere, Batwoman would follow the adventures of Kate Kane — the second incarnation of the Batwoman character in DC Comics lore, introduced in 2006 — who is described as “an out lesbian and highly trained street fighter.”

Batwoman‘s official logline is as follows:

Armed with a passion for social justice and a flair for speaking her mind, Kate Kane soars onto the streets of Gotham as Batwoman, an out lesbian and highly trained street fighter primed to snuff out the failing city’s criminal resurgence. But don’t call her a hero yet. In a city desperate for a savior, Kate must overcome her own demons before embracing the call to be Gotham’s symbol of hope.

Caroline Dries (The Vampire Diaries) will write the project, executive-producing alongside Greg Berlanti, Sarah Schechter and Geoff Johns.

Batwoman’s introduction into the Arrowverse was first announced at The CW Upfront in May, where Stephen Amell revealed that she would be fighting alongside characters from Arrow, The Flash, DC’s Legends of Tomorrow and Supergirl in the network’s next major crossover. (And here’s a fun, though potentially unrelated, fact: In the comics, one of Kate’s main love interests is Maggie Sawyer, formerly portrayed on Supergirl by Floriana Lima.)

COPYRRIGHT BY ANDY SWIFT 2018

REBEKAH by Orson Scott Card



REBEKAH by Orson Scott Card

Rebekah, book two in New York Times bestselling author Orson Scott Card's Women of Genesis series—a unique re-imagining of the biblical tale.

Born into a time and place where a woman speaks her mind at her peril, and reared as a motherless child by a doting father, Rebekah grew up to be a stunning, headstrong beauty. She was chosen by God for a special destiny.

Rebekah leaves her father's house to marry Isaac, the studious young son of the Patriarch Abraham, only to find herself caught up in a series of painful rivalries, first between her husband and his brother Ishmael, and later between her sons Jacob and Esau. Her struggles to find her place in the family of Abraham are a true test of her faith, but through it all she finds her own relationship with God and does her best to serve His cause in the lives of those she loves.

“This playfully speculative novel succeeds in bringing Sarah's oft-overlooked character into vivid relief.”—Publishers Weekly

“This is an inventive and engaging telling of the life of Sarah, the woman who laughed at God’s news (that so old a woman would now bear a child)—and who gives as good as she gets throughout both the book of Genesis and Card’s novel.”—Historical Novel Society

"This series is definitely for those interested in women in the Bible, and in such novels as The Red Tent."—Kliatt

“The story moves swiftly, climaxing at several points, such as Abram and Sarai’s stay in Egypt when the pharaoh wants to take Sarai as his wife. It is a quick and interesting read…. This is an intriguing story.”—Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

ORSON SCOTT CARD is best known for his internationally bestselling science fiction novel Ender’s Game and its many sequels. He has also written contemporary thrillers like Empire and historical novels like the monumental Saints and the bible-based historical novels Sarah and Rachel and Leah and Rebekah.

On Sale July 17, 2018 from Forge Books. 9780765399342. $16.99 USD.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

SKULLSWORN by Brian Staveley



SKULLSWORN by Brian Staveley

Brian Staveley’s new standalone, Skullsworn, returns to the critically acclaimed Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne universe, following a priestess attempting to join the ranks of the God of Death.

Pyrre Lakatur is not, to her mind, an assassin, not a murderer—she is a priestess. At least, she will be once she passes her final trial.

The problem isn’t the killing. The problem, rather, is love. To complete her trial, Pyrre has ten days to kill the seven people enumerated in an ancient song, including “the one who made your mind and body sing with love / who will not come again.”

Pyrre isn’t sure she’s ever been in love. And if she fails to find someone who can draw such passion from her, or fails to kill that someone, her order will give her to their god, the God of Death. Pyrre’s not afraid to die, but she hates to fail, and so, as her trial is set to begin, she returns to the city of her birth in the hope of finding love . . . and ending it on the edge of her sword.

“A lyrical, bloodsoaked, impossible quest that's sure to entertain.—Kevin Hearne, New York Times bestselling author

“Staveley has quickly become one of my favorite fantasy authors, and his latest doesn't disappoint. Skullsworn is a brilliant new chapter in a fabulous series."—V. E. Schwab, New York Times bestselling author

“A warm, funny, character-focused novel which is also darkly charming, bloody, and lethal. It was very, very hard to put down, and had an emotional punch to match its high adrenaline moments.”—Sci Fi and Fantasy Reviews

“Pleasantly grim and emotionally complex.”—Kirkus Reviews

BRIAN STAVELEY is the author of the Chronicles of the Unhewn Throne series, starting with The Emperor's Blades. He has taught literature, religion, history, and philosophy, all subjects that influence his writing, and holds an MA in Creative Writing from Boston University. He works as an editor for Antilever Press, and has published poetry and essays, both in print and on-line. He lives in Vermont with his wife and young son, and divides his time between running trails, splitting wood, writing, and baby-wrangling.

On Sale July 17, 2018 from Tor Books. 9780765389886. $17.99 USD.

Friday, July 13, 2018

THE LAST HARVEST by Kim Liggett




THE LAST HARVEST by Kim Liggett

Kim Liggett draws on her childhood during the Satanic Panic for a chilling tale of magic in The Last Harvest, winner of the 2017 Bram Stoker Award.

"I plead the blood."

Those were the last words seventeen-year-old golden boy quarterback Clay Tate heard rattling from his dad's throat when he discovered him dying on the barn floor of the Neely cattle ranch, clutching a crucifix to his chest.

Now, on the first anniversary of the Midland, Oklahoma, slaughter, the whole town's looking at Clay like he might be next to go over the edge. Clay wants to forget the past, but the sons and daughters of the Preservation Society—a group of prominent farmers his dad accused of devil worship—won't leave him alone. Including Ali, his longtime crush, who suddenly wants to reignite their romance after a year of silence, and hated rival Tyler Neely, who's behaving like they're old friends.

Even as Clay tries to reassure himself, creepy glances turn to sinister stares and strange coincidences build to gruesome rituals, but when he can never prove that any of it happened, Clay worries he might be following his dad down the path to insanity...or that something far more terrifying lies in wait around the corner.

“An eerie new take on the classic Satan-worshipping horror story....With vivid and terrifying characters and events, this novel is chilling, emotional, and full of nightmarish surprises.” - TeenReads

"An utterly terrifying tale that's impossible to put down. It will haunt you long after you've turned the last page. Prepare to be transfixed.”—Jasmine Warga, author of My Heart and Other Black Holes

"The writing is vivid and gorgeous, and the atmosphere is eerie and unnerving and tense. I love it."—April Genevieve Tucholke, author of Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea on The Last Harvest

“This book had me laughing at the same time goose bumps crawled up my arm. Kim has a talent of balancing humor and horror. Inventive, chilling, immersive, and above all terrifying. I love this book.”—Virginia Boecker, author of The Witch Hunter

At sixteen, KIM LIGGETT left her rural midwestern town for New York City to pursue a career in music. Along with lending her voice to hundreds of studio recordings, she was a backup singer for some of the biggest rock bands in the 80s. She is the author of Blood and Salt, Heart of Ash, and The Last Harvest.

On Sale July 24, 2018 from Tor Teen. 9780765380999. $10.99 USD.

Don’t Miss Kim Liggett’s newest novel, THE UNFORTUNATES, on sale July 10, 2018!

Sunday, July 8, 2018

Lost Gods by Micah Yongo



Lost Gods by Micah Yongo

In this extraordinary fantasy debut, a young assassin finds himself hunted by the brothers and sisters he has trained alongside since birth

Neythan is one of five young warriors trained and raised together by a mysterious brotherhood of assassins known as the ShedaĆ­m. When Neythan is framed for the murder of his closest friend, he pursues his betrayer – and in so doing learns there’s far more to the Brotherhood, and the machinations of the rulers of the warring kingdoms, than he’d ever thought possible. His journey will lead him across the five realms, from the Forest of Silences to the Ash Plains of Calapaar, and reveal the breaches that lie beneath the world, and the hidden truths of his oath.

A July release from Angry Robot Books.

Saturday, July 7, 2018

Space Unicorn Blues by TJ Berry




Space Unicorn Blues by TJ Berry

A misfit crew race across the galaxy to prevent the genocide of magical creatures, in this unique science fiction debut

Humanity joining the intergalactic community has been a disaster for Bala, the magical creatures of the galaxy: they’ve been exploited, enslaved and ground down for parts. Now the Century Summit is approaching, when humans will be judged by godlike aliens.

When Jenny Perata, disabled Maori shuttle captain, is contracted to take a shipment to the summit, she must enlist half-unicorn Gary Cobalt, whose horn powers faster-than-light travel. But he’s just been released from prison, for murdering the wife of Jenny’s co-pilot, Cowboy Jim… When the Reason regime suddenly enact laws making Bala property, Jenny’s ship becomes the last hope for magic.

A July release from Angry Robot.

Monday, July 2, 2018

Walking With Ghosts by Brian James Freeman



WALKING WITH GHOSTS
, Brian James Freeman, PS Publishing, 308 pages, £20, 9781786363237, reviewed by Barry Hunter.

This is a fantastic volume that gathers together the majority of Brian James Freeman’s short stories. If you have never read any of Brian’s stories, getting this volume will make your reading cup overflow with goodness.

After a forward by William Peter Blatty (yes, that Peter Blatty), the book is divided into four parts: Weak and Wounded, More Than Midnight, Dreamlike States and Lost and Lonely. You can be sure that the stories fit the description and will possibly leave you weak, lost, lonely, having strange dreams, and up after midnight because you want to finish this volume.

Favorites are “Mama’s Sleeping” is the kind of story that most cable installers might shy away from. “The Final Lesson” is one that when learned, will stick with you for a while. “Not Without Regrets” might just be a saying you hear, but after reading this story you might look at stormy nights differently. “Ice Cold Dan the Ice Cream Man” is an Afghan veteran with PTSD who keeps a rifle on his truck in case the enemy comes back. “One Way Flight” is one of those stories that you do not want to read before you have to fly. “The Last Beautiful Day” is the one story that hit too close to home and helped bring a good cry that had been long in coming.

This a volume that should definitely find a place on your horror shelf, especially if you prefer that psychologic horror that sneaks up behind you and slaps you in the back of your head. Dan is one of the folk that come into my office every day looking for help and I try to help them resolve the problem before it gets out of hand. Beautiful days are hard to come by, especially after reading this story and knowing exactly the feelings evoked. Brian James Freeman is a force to be reckoned with. He writes extremely well and his stories pack a punch to the gut. And to the heart.

This will be available in August, but you need to pre-order it now so you won’t be disappointed. www.pspublishing.co.uk is the link to use.

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Goodbye Harlan



I was not able to get onto social media until tonight. When I got on Twitter, the first one I read was by Joe Lansdale saying that Harlan Ellison had passed over in his sleep. Harlan was 84 and although he had been sick, I would have expected him to go out giving the Grim Reaper a critique on his style.

It has been said that just about everyone in fandom has a "Harlan story". I have heard a lot of them. Many from Harlan himself. I can think of the letters I received over the course of Baryons life span. All of them marked "not for publication". One of the reasons was that it ruin his reputation as an angry, hard to get along with curmudgeon.

When we finally met in person, he yelled across the DragonCon Auditorium "Hey Susan, It's Barry". I was surprised that Susan had any idea who I was. All of our times together were too short, but at least they happened.

All my memories of Harlan are good ones. I cherish them, I am amazed at some of them, and tonight, I feel them in my heart and it is hurting.

My sympathy to Susan, I share your pain.

Goodbye Harlan, my friend.

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Veteran sets himself on fire in front of Georgia Capitol, protesting treatment by VA



An Air Force veteran set himself on fire in front of Georgia’s state Capitol in Atlanta on Tuesday morning, reportedly in an act of protest against the Department of Veterans Affairs.

What happened?


The 58-year-old man parked his vehicle next to the Capitol around 10:45 a.m., then walked toward the building according to police.

Georgia State Patrol Capt. Mark Perry said, “He was strapped with some homemade incendiary devices, some firecrackers, and doused himself with some kind of flammable liquid and attempted to set himself on fire.”

An off-duty trooper happened to be driving by in his patrol car and realized what was happening. He rushed toward the veteran with a fire extinguisher “and was able to douse him pretty quickly” Capt. Perry said.

The veteran was rushed to Grady Memorial Hospital with burns covering 85 to 90 percent of his body. His identity has not been released.

Officials closed off streets surrounding the Capitol, evacuated the building as well as judiciary buildings and a nearby day care. They also searched the vet’s vehicle (as well as the Capitol grounds) for any possible additional explosives.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Atlanta Police, and the George Bureau of Investigation all worked in coordination following the incident.

Why?

Commissioner Mark McDonough of the Georgia Department of Public Safety told reporters, “It looks like a veteran that was disgruntled with the VA did a personal protest in front of the Capitol which involved gasoline and some fireworks.”

Captain Perry confirmed that the vet was able to speak after the incident, saying, “He did indicate that he is disgruntled with the V.A. system and was seeking attention for that.”

Anything else?

This is the second time in just a few years that a veteran has publicly set themselves on fire in protest of the VA. A 51-year-old vet died in March of 2016, after fatally burning himself outside a New Jersey Veterans Affairs clinic out of protest for not receiving the care he needed.

For several years, the VA has been plagued by scandals. President Trump has vowed to clean up the Department, signing last year’s VA accountability act into law, firing secretary of veterans affairs David Shulkin in March, and donating one quarter of the president’s own first quarter salary to the Department of Veterans Affairs in May.

COPYRIGHT 11ALIVE, ATLANTA 2018

Photos from Vietnam, all those years ago


Photo of Vietnamese fisherman on the Mekong Delta where Agent Orange killed all the trees.


Some of the bugs that Raid couldn't kill.

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

The VA’s latest betrayal of Vietnam veterans



Opinion


The VA’s latest betrayal of Vietnam veterans

By Betsy McCaughey

President Trump just signed the Mission Act, which is supposed to help ailing US veterans get prompt care, including the ability to see a civilian doctor on Uncle Sam’s tab.

Don’t count on it.

The fine print shows that vets are guaranteed nothing. The Veterans Affairs secretary is simply empowered to make rules for who gets civilian care. Though Trump and his pick for secretary, Robert Wilkie, favor making it easy for vets, Wilkie’s rules could last only as long as Wilkie remains in office. Worse, they don’t go into effect for two and a half years.

That’s too late for the hundreds of Vietnam vets, now in their 60s and early 70s, who are carrying a dangerous parasite picked up in Asia called liver fluke. Many don’t know it, but it’s a ticking time bomb likely to kill them.

Scandalously, the VA is doing zip to identify and treat these infected vets, even though an ultrasound test can detect liver-fluke infection in minutes and medicine can slow its progression into lethal bile-duct cancer. If there were ever an example of vets needing to be in the driver’s seat about getting outside care, this is it. But the Mission Act requires them to get their VA doctor’s permission first.

Remember the nation’s shock in 2014 when 40 vets died on secret waitlists concocted by VA bureaucrats? That toll is miniscule compared with the deaths being caused right now by the VA’s neglect of vets with liver fluke.

In January, researchers at the Northport, NY, VA found that one out of every five vets tested who remembers eating raw fish in Vietnam — a common practice when rations ran out — is carrying the parasite. More than 100,000 vets could be infected. The parasite lingers in the body for decades, and then — wham — can suddenly cause deadly bile-duct cancer. Some 80-90 percent of them will develop the cancer if their infection goes untreated, according to New York physician Dr. John Cahill, an expert on parasites.

“It’s a huge number,” says Dr. Devi Nampiaparampil, associate professor at New York University Langone Medical Center.

Cahill says he’d like to see every vet who ate raw fish while in Vietnam contacted for an ultrasound.

Instead, the VA is serving up gibberish, claiming “there is currently no evidence that vets have higher infection rates than the general population.”

That’s ridiculous. You can’t get infected with liver fluke in the US. The parasite doesn’t exist here. Cahill calls bile-duct cancer “extremely rare” among the US population. The other highest-risk group is Asian-Americans who travel or once resided in Southeast Asia.

Here’s another whopper. The VA is telling vets if they don’t have jaundice or other symptoms, “they don’t need screening.” In fact, Nampiaparampil stresses that by the time those symptoms appear, the cancer has often progressed too far.

The VA claims there’s “no definitive link” between the parasite and cancer. In truth, there’s a pile of research linking the two. Researchers at Tulane and George Washington University proved the link in 2007 in an article “Liver Fluke Induces Cholangiocarcinoma.” So did findings in the journal Cancer Science in 2010, calling liver-fluke infection “the strongest risk factor” for cancer of the bile duct.

The VA double talk is typical. They did the same thing with service-linked ailments from the Gulf War. This time the VA is launching a “large-scale epidemiological study” that will be ready in about two years.

Pile up reports and do nothing. You could pave over Washington, DC, with the reports produced by the VA.

Meanwhile, Facebook and local newspapers are chronicling the deaths of Vietnam vets from liver-fluke-related cancer.

Time is running out. Vietnam vets need to be contacted, tested if they ate raw fish and treated if they have the infection. The Mission Act isn’t going to save them or other sick vets, any more than previous VA “reform” laws, all hailed by self-congratulating Washington pols when they were passed.


Betsy McCaughey is a senior fellow at the London Center for Policy Research.

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Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Trump Signs VA MISSION ACT OF 2018


PRESIDENT DONALD J. TRUMP PROVIDES RESOURCES FOR VETERANS TO GET THE CARE THEY DESERVE FROM THE DOCTORS THEY WANT
“My pledge to you, our noble warriors, is that my Administration will support you, and your loved ones, and your amazing families every single day, now and always.” – President Donald J. Trump



FUNDING HEALTHCARE FOR OUR VETERANS: Today, the President signed legislation providing our veterans with the funding they have earned through their sacrifices for our country.

· President Trump signed S. 2372, the John S. McCain III, Daniel K. Akaka, and Samuel R. Johnson VA Maintaining Internal Systems and Strengthening Integrated Outside Networks Act of 2018, or the VA MISSION Act of 2018.

· America’s veterans deserve timely access to the highest quality of care possible and funding for the programs that keep them healthy and well.

o That is why President Trump and the Department of Veterans Affairs worked closely with Congress and Veterans Service Organizations to create draft legislation to support our veterans.

· The VA MISSION Act provides $5.2 billion in mandatory funding for the Veterans Choice program until a new consolidated program is implemented, which provides veterans with flexibility to receive care at both Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and private health facilities.

· Since its creation in 2014, more than two million veterans have used the Veterans Choice program and have scheduled more than 41 million appointments in their communities.

STREAMLINING VETERANS CHOICE: The VA MISSION Act consolidates the VA’s community care programs, creating a new, single program for veterans care.

· The VA MISSION Act takes the long-overdue step of consolidating the complex, bureaucratic web created by seven different veterans community care programs into one unified program, simplifying and strengthening healthcare opportunities for America’s veterans.

o The new program is projected to take effect one year from enactment.

· The new consolidated program will increase transparency and accountability, and ensure that veterans receive the right care at the right time with the right provider.

· The bill also accelerates the processing of claims by community providers so that they are addressed in a prompt and timely manner.

· The bill authorizes access to walk-in community clinics, so that veterans have immediate, local access to non-emergency convenience care.

· The new program strengthens the process between the VA and the community healthcare providers who prescribe opioids to veterans.

IMPROVING AND EXPANDING CARE: The VA MISSION Act provides new resources and creates new programs to build on and improve the care our veterans receive.

· The VA MISSION Act expands eligibility for the Comprehensive Assistance for Family Caregivers program, allowing caregivers for all veterans to access.

· The bill removes barriers for telemedicine, provides additional resources for hiring and retaining healthcare professionals, and establishes mobile deployment teams to support underserved facilities, among other important steps to improve veterans’ care.

· The bill further allows the VA to modernize its assets and infrastructure to serve our veterans in the best possible way.

Sunday, May 27, 2018

Flight or Fright, edited by Stephen King & Bev Vincent


Flight or Fright, edited by Stephen King & Bev Vincent, Cemetery Dance, $27.95, reviewed by Jim Brock.

Back when I worked for a living, I took quite a few airplane rides around this country. One night on a flight from Memphis to Chattanooga, Tennessee on Southern Airlines, we experienced quite a bit of turbulence because of a storm and upon landing I heard a boom and saw flames shooting out the front of an engine. I wasn't scared, but I was concerned.

The last flight I took was well before 9/11. Since then I haven't found anywhere I wanted to go that would make me undergo the hassles of airports and airline travel. Flight or Fright has given me seventeen other reasons to avoid airplanes - much more so than just the hassle.

Stephen King and Bev Vincent have assembled an unusual range of authors and an outstanding group of stories featuring some of the greatest names of the past one hundred years and their contributions to the terrors of the sky.

When you see a list that features Richard Matheson and Ray Bradbury, you know the editors know what they are doing. The title, Flight or Fright tells you exactly what to expect. My favorites include Matheson and Bradbury but also Dan Simmons, E.C. Tubb, John Varley and Arthur Conan Doyle. These writers have given me untold reading adventures and pleasures for years.

This is a great anthology with a great theme and great editors. It is definitely worth the hassles to take these flights.

Friday, May 18, 2018

The Outsider by Stephen King out May 22


THE OUTSIDER - Available May 22nd

An unspeakable crime. A confounding investigation. At a time when the King brand has never been stronger, he has delivered one of his most unsettling and compulsively readable stories.

An eleven-year-old boy's violated corpse is found in a town park. Eyewitnesses and fingerprints point unmistakably to one of Flint City’s most popular citizens. He is Terry Maitland, Little League coach, English teacher, husband, and father of two girls. Detective Ralph Anderson, whose son Maitland once coached, orders a quick and very public arrest. Maitland has an alibi, but Anderson and the district attorney soon add DNA evidence to go with the fingerprints and witnesses. Their case seems ironclad.

As the investigation expands and horrifying answers begin to emerge, King’s propulsive story kicks into high gear, generating strong tension and almost unbearable suspense. Terry Maitland seems like a nice guy, but is he wearing another face? When the answer comes, it will shock you as only Stephen King can.

THE OUTSIDER will be available in hardcover, ebook, and in audiobook read by Will Patton on May 22nd

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Boston Massacre ► Seventy-two Killed Resisting Gun Confiscation in Boston



Boston Massacre ► Seventy-two Killed Resisting Gun Confiscation in Boston

National Guard units seeking to confiscate a cache of recently banned assault weapons were ambushed by elements of a Para-military extremist faction. Military and law enforcement sources estimate that 72 were killed and more than 200 injured before government forces were compelled to withdraw. Speaking after the clash, Massachusetts Governor Thomas Gage declared that the extremist faction, which was made up of local citizens, has links to the radical right-wing tax protest movement. Gage blamed the extremists for recent incidents of vandalism directed against internal revenue offices. The governor, who described the group’s organizers as “criminals,” issued an executive order authorizing the summary arrest of any individual who has interfered with the government’s efforts to secure law and order.

The military raid on the extremist arsenal followed wide-spread refusal by the local citizenry to turn over recently outlawed assault weapons. Gage issued a ban on military-style assault weapons and ammunition earlier in the week. This decision followed a meeting in early this month between government and military leaders at which the governor authorized the forcible confiscation of illegal arms. One government official, speaking on condition of anonymity, pointed out that “none of these people would have been killed had the extremists obeyed the law and turned over their weapons voluntarily.” Government troops initially succeeded in confiscating a large supply of outlawed weapons and ammunition. However, troops attempting to seize arms and ammunition in Lexington met with resistance from heavily-armed extremists who had been tipped off regarding the government’s plans.

During a tense standoff in the Lexington town park, National Guard Colonel Francis Smith, commander of the government operation, ordered the armed group to surrender and return to their homes. The impasse was broken by a single shot, which was reportedly fired by one of the right-wing extremists. Eight civilians were killed in the ensuing exchange. Ironically, the local citizenry blamed government forces rather than the extremists for the civilian deaths. Before order could be restored, armed citizens from surrounding areas had descended upon the guard units. Colonel Smith, finding his forces over matched by the armed mob, ordered a retreat.

Governor Gage has called upon citizens to support the state/national joint task force in its effort to restore law and order. The governor also demanded the surrender of those responsible for planning and leading the attack against the government troops. Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, and John Hancock, who have been identified as “ringleaders” of the extremist faction, remain at large.

And this fellow Americans, is how the American Revolution began, April 20, 1775.

On July 4th, 1776 these same extremists signed the Declaration of Independence, pledging to each other and their countrymen their lives, fortunes, and sacred honor. Many of them lost everything, including their families and their lives over the course of the next few years. Lest we forget… [Source: Frontlines of Freedom Newsletter | May 11, 2018 ++]

Author Tom Wolfe dies at 87



Author Tom Wolfe dies at 87
Tuesday, May 15, 2018, 8:27 AM PT

From various news sources

Tom Wolfe, author of bestselling books including “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, “The Bonfire of the Vanities” and “The Right Stuff” has died at the age of 87.

Tom Wolfe loved American culture for all its excess. Groupies, doormen, hippies, astronauts, bankers and frat boys took on a magisterial presence in his writing, and if there was a hint of hypocrisy in their actions, then all the better.

Wolfe reveled in worlds where people stood tall and acted with extravagance and swagger. He often joined the parade himself, author-turned-celebrity in his cream-colored suit, walking stick in hand.

Fervent disciple — if not the high priest — of New Journalism, he brought to his stories techniques often reserved for fiction and dispensed candid and often droll commentary on the obsessions and passing trends of American society. The author of 15 books, fiction and nonfiction, Wolfe is credited with such phrases as "radical chic," "the me-decade" and "the right stuff."

Kurt Vonnegut considered him a genius. Mary Gordon called him a thinking man's redneck. Surfers in La Jolla labeled him a dork after he profiled them. The novelist John Gregory Dunne observed that his writings have the capacity "to drive otherwise sane and sensible people clear around the bend."

Once asked why critics despised him, Wolfe said, "Intellectuals aren't used to being written about. When they aren't taken seriously and become part of the human comedy, they have a tendency to squeal like weenies over an open fire."

One of the most conspicuous voices in American letters, Wolfe died Monday at a Manhattan hospital, according to his agent, Lynn Nesbit. He was 88. He had been hospitalized with an infection, according to the Guardian.

"Tom was a singular talent," said his friend Gay Talese. "He was an extraordinarily active reporter whose unique prose was supported on a foundation of solid research."

Often considered a satirist for his broadly drawn portraits, Wolfe saw himself as a realist and supported the claim with his reporting. "Every kind of writer," he once proclaimed, "should get away from the desk and see things they don't know about."

"Tom had an extraordinarily sharp eye and a commitment to tell the truth," said Jann Wenner, friend and founding editor of Rolling Stone magazine. "He didn't write out of malice. He went to the essence of the matter and called it like he saw it."

His pen may have been caustic, but Wolfe in person was unfailingly courteous, according to Pat Strachan, former senior editor at Little, Brown who worked with him since the late 1970s.

"His publishers and their staffs know that he was an exceptionally good-natured, considerate, and generous man — a kind and brilliant man," Strachan said.

Wolfe got his start in 1963 with a story that he almost couldn't write. He had gone to California to report on renegade car designers working out of garages in Burbank and Lynwood. After racking up a $750 tab at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel, he returned to New York and stared at his typewriter, unable to find the right words.

As the deadline neared, he typed up his notes for his editor who planned to reassign the story to another writer. Ten hours and 49 pages later, Wolfe had "The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby."

In 1965, the story became a centerpiece for a collection of essays that established his national reputation as a writer who didn't use the English language so much as detonate it. Allusions, dramatic asides, neologisms and flamboyant punctuation became the hallmarks of his style.

Surfers, sitting on the edge of the break, were like "Phrygian sacristans."

Chuck Yeager, punching through the sound barrier above the Mojave, saw the sky turn "deep purple and all at once the stars and the moon came out — and the sun shone at the same time."

A speedboat, racing across Miami's Biscayne Bay, slams against the waves, "throttle wide open forty-five miles an hour against the wind SMACK bouncing bouncing its shallow aluminum hull SMACK from swell SMACK to swell SMACK."

"What Tom did with words is what French Impressionists did with color," said Larry Dietz, editor and friend.

A disciplined writer, Wolfe held himself to a quota of 10 triple-spaced pages a day, but writing was never fun for Wolfe. "It's the hardest work in the world," he said. "The only thing that will get you through it is maybe someone will applaud when it's over."

***

Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr. was born in Richmond, Va., on March 2, 1931. Magnolia-lined streets, his neighbors' accent and his mother's mint tea gave his childhood a genteel, decidedly Southern air. His grandfather had been a rifleman for the Confederacy.

Wolfe claimed that as a child, he would thank God at night for being born in the greatest city in the greatest state in the greatest country in the world.

Wolfe's mother was a landscape designer, and his father was an agronomist at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and an editor for an agricultural magazine. He had a sister who was five years younger than him. Watching his father work — seeing scribbled notes on a legal pad transformed into pristine type on the page — sparked Wolfe's ambition to be a writer.

At Washington and Lee University, he helped edit the campus newspaper and co-founded its literary quarterly. He played baseball and was known on the mound for a sinker and slider. When he was 21, he unsuccessfully tried out for the New York Giants.

He received a doctorate from Yale in 1957 in American Studies, and after sending out applications to 53 newspapers, took a job as a reporter for the Springfield Union in Massachusetts. The most difficult phone call he ever made, he said, was to let his father know that instead of becoming a professor, he was going to be a reporter.

He told an interviewer that he enjoyed "the cowboy nature of journalism, the idea that it wasn't really respectable, and yet it was exciting, even in a literary way."

After three years in Massachusetts and two years with the Washington Post, he headed to the New York Herald Tribune where he would show up each day in a $200 cream-colored suit, which he wore as "a harmless form of aggression" against New Yorkers unaccustomed to seeing lighter shades worn during winter.

Once asked to describe the ensemble, he called it "neo-pretentious," but he also discovered the style had an advantage. "If people see that you are an outsider," he said, "they will come up and tell you things."

Writing for the Tribune's Sunday magazine, Wolfe dressed up his stories with scenes, dialogue and a raucous point of view that soon distinguished the New Journalism, a phrase credited to writer Pete Hamill and whose practitioners included Hunter S. Thompson, Norman Mailer, Joan Didion and Talese.

"I had the feeling, rightly or wrongly, that I was doing things no one had ever done in journalism," Wolfe said.

His style would inspire a generation of writers, including satirist Christopher Buckley.

"His prose was so brilliant, so alive, so erudite, so thrumming with electricity, and so new that you thought, 'Wow. I didn't realize we were allowed to do this,'" Buckley said. "And into the bargain, the white suit! This was flash of the highest order, and it made thousands of people my age want not only to be writers, but to be Tom Wolfe."

***

As much as the words themselves, Wolfe's perspective caught the attention of readers and critics. At a time when Vietnam cast a shadow across American life, he discovered something bright in stories about stock cars, Cassius Clay, Hugh Hefner and the club scene in London.

"What struck me … was that so many people have found such novel ways of doing just that, enjoying, extending their ego way out on the best terms available, namely their own," he said.

Wolfe's amazement, however, could strike a withering tone, such as the time he invited himself to a cocktail party held for the Black Panthers in the Park Avenue penthouse of Leonard Bernstein and his wife, Felicia.

The year was 1970, and the gathering was a fundraiser for members of the party who had been held in prison for nine months without trial. In "The Radical Chic," Wolfe savaged the evening with a portrait of the fashionably liberal crowd engaging with militants over canapes.

The story brought to light the conservative side to Wolfe's politics.

"He had this kind of cynicism about liberalism," said writer and friend Ann Louise Bardach. "If you look at what upset Tom, it was the card-carrying, raving, bring-down-the-barricade liberalism, but more than that, he was contrarian and a cynic in the sense that every great reporter is."

He would later attend a state dinner at the White House during the Reagan administration, support President George W. Bush and complain against having to pay too much income tax. Walking the crowded streets of New York, Wolfe would wear a American flag lapel pin that he likened to "holding up a cross to werewolves."

An inveterate New Yorker, Wolfe once said that he could imagine living nowhere else. "Pandemonium with a big grin on it," he called Manhattan and claimed that his favorite past time was window shopping.

Single until he was 47, he met his wife, Sheila Berger, at Harper's magazine where she was an art director. They married in 1978 after a long courtship and kept a two-story town house on the Upper East Side and a home in Southampton, on Long Island.

They had two children, Alexandra, a one-time staffer at the New York Observer and now a freelance writer, and Tommy, who distinguished himself in college as a champion squash player.

Coming off the success of his ambitious and lucrative portrait of the space program, "The Right Stuff," which was made into an Academy Award-winning movie, Wolfe turned from journalism to fiction. Having attacked contemporary novelists for their limited ambitions, he felt it only fair that he try the form himself.

His first novel, "The Bonfire of the Vanities," was serialized in Rolling Stone. A sprawling portrait of New York City in the 1980s, it became a bestseller in 1986.

Three years later, flush with success, he issued a cri de coeur calling "a battalion, a brigade, of Zolas to head out into this wild, bizarre, unpredictable, hog-stomping baroque country of ours and reclaim its literary property."

In 1996, he had a heart attack that required a quintuple bypass, and afterward, he talked about being depressed and foregoing the white suit. "I've never been depressed before," he told Time magazine.

Upon recovery, he reclaimed his sartorial identity and went on to write three more novels: "A Man in Full" in 1998, "I Am Charlotte Simmons" in 2004, and "Back to Blood" in 2012. It was an accomplishment that impressed Talese from the start when Wolfe wrote "The Bonfire of the Vanities."

"Here was a writer who stuck his neck out, criticizing fiction writers and their work," Talese said. "Then he goes ahead and writes a novel. He knows he will get killed critically because everyone in the literary establishment will have it in for him."

Wolfe had his revenge, as Talese pointed out, when his books became bestsellers. He was honored in 2010 by the National Book Foundation for his contribution to American letters.

Tom Wolfe is survived by his wife, Shelia, and his children, Alexandra and Tommy.

Friday, May 11, 2018

A new Shannara book from Terry Brooks


Following The Black Elfstone, The Skaar Invasion is the second book of the epic four-part conclusion to the Shannara series from one of the acknowledged masters of the fantasy genre.

The Four Lands are under siege. Wielding a magical ability virtually impossible to combat, mysterious invaders defeat the most fearsome Troll armies, then focus their savagery on the Druid order—and all hope seems lost.

Eventually the invaders reveal a more human face, but understanding their motives in no way mitigates the brutality of their actions. Dar Leah, once the High Druid’s Blade, has crossed paths—and swords—with their ruthless leader before. So he knows that if any hope exists, it rests in the hands of the Druid Drisker Arc, now trapped inside vanished Paranor.

As Drisker races to find the ancient knowledge that could free him, Dar goes in search of Tarsha Kaynin, the young woman blessed with the powerful gift of the wishsong, whose magic could draw Drisker back into the world of the living. But little do they know that what appeared to be a formidable invading force may only be the forerunner of a much larger army—one intent on nothing less than total conquest.

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Today in History


On this day in 1950, Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (1911-1986) publishes Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health. With this book, Hubbard introduced a branch of self-help psychology called Dianetics, which quickly caught fire and, over time, morphed into a belief system boasting millions of subscribers: Scientology.

Hubbard was already a prolific and frequently published writer by the time he penned the book that would change his life. Under several pseudonyms in the 1930s, he published a great amount of pulp fiction, particularly in the science fiction and fantasy genres. In late 1949, having returned from serving in the Navy in World War II, Hubbard began publishing articles in the pages of Astounding Science Fiction, a magazine that published works by the likes of Isaac Asimov and Jack Williamson. Out of these grew the elephantine text known as Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

In Dianetics, Hubbard explained that phenomena known as “engrams” (i.e. memories) were the cause of all psychological pain, which in turn harmed mental and physical health. He went on to claim that people could become “clear,” achieving an exquisite state of clarity and mental liberation, by exorcising their engrams to an “auditor,” or a listener acting as therapist.

Though discredited by the medical and scientific establishment, over 100,000 copies of Dianetics were sold in the first two years of publication, and Hubbard soon found himself lecturing across the country. He went on to write six more books in 1951, developing a significant fan base, and establishing the Hubbard Dianetics Research Foundation in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

Despite his fast-growing popularity from books and touring, strife within his organization and Hubbard’s own personal troubles nearly crippled his success. Several of his research foundations had to be abandoned due to financial troubles and he went through a divorce from his second wife.

By 1953, however, Hubbard was able to rebound from the widespread condemnation beginning to be heaped upon him, and introduced Scientology. Scientology expanded on Dianetics by bringing Hubbard’s popular version of psychotherapy into the realm of philosophy, and ultimately, religion. In only a few years, Hubbard found himself at the helm of a movement that captured the popular imagination. As Scientology grew in the 1960s, several national governments became suspicious of Hubbard, accusing him of quackery and brainwashing his followers. Nonetheless, Hubbard built his religion into a multi-million dollar movement that continues to have a considerable presence in the public eye, due in part to its high profile in Hollywood.

Monday, May 7, 2018

OLIVER NORTH WILL BE NEW NRA PRESIDENT



Retired Lt. Col. Oliver North slated to become president of the NRA

Retired Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North, a central figure of the Iran-Contra affair in the 1980s, will become president of the National Rifle Association in coming weeks, the NRA announced.

North, a member of the NRA board, author, and political commentator, plans to retire from Fox News immediately to take on the role. North will take over from NRA President Pete Brownell, who is not seeking a second term.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Sunday, April 15, 2018

R. Lee Ermey dies at 74. RIP Gunny!



From Fox News Copyright 2018.

R. Lee Ermey, a former Marine Corps drill instructor known to millions of moviegoers as the sadistic Gunnery Sgt. Hartman in Stanley Kubrick's "Full Metal Jacket," died Sunday morning, according to his longtime manager. He was 74.

In a statement posted on Twitter, Bill Rogin said Ermey had died due to complications from pneumonia.

"He will be greatly missed by all of us," Rogin wrote. "Semper Fi, Gunny. Godspeed."

A Kansas native, Ermey enlisted in the Marine Corps and age 17 and spent 14 months in Vietnam before he was discharged in 1972. He served as a technical advisor in Francis Ford Coppola's Vietnam War epic, "Apocalypse Now," in which he also had a small role as a helicopter pilot.

But Ermey didn't get his big break until nine years later, in Kubrick's own take on Vietnam.

An outspoken conservative, Ermey spoke to Fox News in 2016 about being "blackballed" from Hollywood over his political views.

"I've had a very fruitful career. I've done over 70 feature films," he said. "I've done over 200 episodes of ['GunnyTime']... and then [Hollywood] found out that I'm a Conservative."

Actually, he corrected, "I'm an Independent, but I said something bad about the president. I had something unsavory to say about the president's administration, and even though I did vote for him the first time around, I was blackballed."

Ermey, who was an NRA board member, said at the time that his association with the organization and his disapproval of President Obama cost him acting jobs.

"Do you realize I have not done a movie in five to six years? Why? Because I was totally blackballed by the ... liberals in Hollywood," he alleged. "They can destroy you. They're hateful people [who] don't just not like you, they want to take away your livelihood ... that's why I live up in the desert on a dirt road ... I don't have to put up with their crap."

Saturday, April 14, 2018

Art Bell Passes Away at 72


Art Bell Passes Away at 72

Art Bell, founder and former host of Coast to Coast AM, passed away Friday, April 13. He was 72-years-old. The Nye County Sheriff's Office reports Bell died at his home in Pahrump, Nevada. An official cause of death has not yet been determined. Stay tuned for more information.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Jim Davis, creator of Garfield, interview


Garfield's creator, Jim Davis is interviewed on The Original Van Gogh's Ear Anthology website. Interesting look at imagination and appealing to the masses

https://theoriginalvangoghsearanthology.com/2018/04/08/an-interview-with-jim-davis-2/

Monday, April 9, 2018

SMELLS LIKE FINN SPIRIT by Randy Henderson


SMELLS LIKE FINN SPIRIT by Randy Henderson

Finn Graymare is back in the final installment of Randy Henderson's Familia Arcana series, Smells Like Finn Spirit.

Finn's re-adaptation to the human world is not going so well. He's got a great girlfriend, and is figuring out how things like the internet work, but he is still carrying the disembodied personality of Alynon, Prince of the Silver Demesne, the fae who had occupied his body during his imprisonment. And he's not getting along at all with his older brother. And oh, by the way, his dead grandfather is still trying to possess him in order to bring about Armageddon.

“Finn Fancy is urban fantasy with a pop culture sweet tooth...rollicking and charming as Finn Fancy Necromancy.”—NPR

“Quite a bit of fun.” —Buzzfeed

“A hold-on-tight romp through all things weird and fantastical.” —School Library Journal on Finn Fancy Necromancy

“Absolutely marvelous. A funny, quirky, and compelling tale full of fantastic twists and dire conspiracies.”—Kat Richardson, bestselling author of the Greywalker series

“A fast-paced fantasy mystery.... The quick turns of the mystery plot make this a speedy and enjoyable read.”—Kirkus Reviews

RANDY HENDERSON, author of Finn Fancy Necromancy, and Bigfootloose and Finn Fancy Free, is the grand prize winner of Writers of the Future Award, a Clarion West graduate, and member of SFWA and Codex. His fiction has appeared in Penumbra, Escape Pod, and Realms of Fantasy, and has been included in anthologies.

On Sale April 24, 2018 from Tor Books. 9780765392664. $18.99 USD.

Check out the first two books in The Familia Arcana series, Finn Fancy Necromancy and Bigfootloose and Finn Fancy Free.

Sunday, April 8, 2018

MARTIANS ABROAD by Carrie Vaughn


MARTIANS ABROAD by Carrie Vaughn

A great new stand-alone science fiction novel from Carrie Vaughn, author of the Kitty Norville series.

Polly Newton has one single-minded dream, to be a starship pilot and travel the galaxy. Her mother, the Director of the Mars Colony, derails Polly's plans when she sends Polly and her genius twin brother, Charles, to Galileo Academy on Earth.

Strange, unexplained, dangerous coincidences centered on their high-profile classmates begin piling up. There's more going on than would appear, and the stakes are high. Polly is determined to find the truth, no matter the cost.

“A tribute to the power of science fiction, evoking a giddy sense of wonder and adventure about space exploration, technology, and human ingenuity.” —NPR

"This is a classic...adventurous...with retro SF twists that nod to Heinlein’s oeuvre." —Booklist

"This easygoing adventure has an affable appeal."—Kirkus

"The whole story is great fun. Your Heinlein itch will be scratched in a 21st-century way" —RT Book Reviews

"Exciting, entertaining."—The Irresponsible Reader

"A refreshing mix of teen drama and science."—Elitist Book Reviews

CARRIE VAUGHN is best known for her New York Times bestselling series of novels about a werewolf named Kitty who hosts a talk radio show for the supernaturally disadvantaged. Her novels include a near-Earth space opera, Martians Abroad, from Tor Books, and the post-apocalyptic murder mysteries Bannerless and The Wild Dead. She's written several other contemporary fantasy and young adult novels, as well as upwards of 80 short stories, two of which have been finalists for the Hugo Award. She's a contributor to the Wild Cards series of shared world superhero books edited by George R. R. Martin and a graduate of the Odyssey Fantasy Writing Workshop. An Air Force brat, she survived her nomadic childhood and managed to put down roots in Boulder, Colorado.

On Sale April 24, 2018 from Tor Books. 9780765382214. $15.99 USD.